Employees help in road accident

employees giving first aid in road accident

Employees at our national headquarters in St Johns Lane, London, raced to the scene of a road accident to give first aid care to an injured cyclist.

The casualty had been knocked off her bike by a lorry on the busy Clerkenwell Road outside the HQ building.

Lucy Johnston, 21, a student at City University, Islington was the first on the scene to help and said: 'I had first aid training a few years ago with St John Ambulance and it came back to me that I should try and keep her head still in case of injury. I stayed with her like this until the first aiders arrived.

'The training I had was really good and very hands on so I obviously remembered some of that. I think I'm going to spend my summer holidays refreshing my training.' 

A quick-thinking employee called on first aid trained colleagues, John Newman and Caitlin McCullen - who are also volunteers - to help the injured lady. They arrived on the scene to find Lucy already helping keep the lady still. They performed cervical spine control, administered oxygen brought to the scene by an off-duty policeman and dressed an injury whilst treating her for shock.

'The training I had was really good and very hands on so I obviously remembered some of that. I think I'm going to spend my summer holidays refreshing my training

Lucy Johnston
Bystander

John Newman, Medical Manager for St John Ambulance and also a Volunteer Ambulance Crew Member said: 'The cyclist was responsive and Lucy did a great job to keep the situation under control and the casualty's head and neck still until we arrived. It meant that no further damage was done and we were able to carry out the necessary assessments and treatment until handing over to the London Ambulance Service crew when they arrived. We worked with them to immobilise her neck and load her on to their ambulance.

'Our mission at St John Ambulance is that everyone who needs it should receive first aid from those around them. No one should suffer for the lack of trained first aiders. As a result of the training Lucy received as a member of the public and the training we received as volunteers, the casualty was dealt with in a confident and efficient manner and was cared for until the emergency services arrived.'