Emergency advice

Applying a dressing:

  1. Wash hands.
  2. Put on gloves.
  3. Place dressing on top of wound.
  4. Secure with adhesive tape or roller bandage.

When applying a dressing always wear disposable gloves. Some dressings have a wound dressing and bandage attached.

What to do

How to apply a dressing with a bandage attached

  1. Wash hands and put on disposable, non-latex gloves before touching a dressing or wound. We recommend using nitrile powder-free gloves for your first aid kit.

  2. Unfold the dressing pad and lay it directly on top of the wound, keeping it in place by holding the bandage on each side. Make sure the dressing covers beyond the edge of the wound.

  3. Wrap the short end of the bandage around the injured part to secure the dressing pad.

  4. Then wrap the longer end around the injured part, making sure all of the dressing pad is covered. Leave the short end hanging out.

  5. Secure the bandage by tying the short and long ends together in a reef knot, over the top of the pad to keep pressure on the wound.

  6. Then check their circulation. To do this press a nail or skin beyond the wound for five seconds until it goes pale. If the colour doesn’t come back within two seconds, the bandage is too tight so you’ll need to loosen it. Keep checking their circulation every 10 minutes.

  7. If blood comes through the dressing, don’t remove it but apply a second dressing over the top. If it comes through the second dressing, take off both dressings and apply a new one, putting pressure on the bleed.

How to apply a sterile pad or gauze

  1. Wash hands and put on disposable, non-latex gloves before touching a dressing or wound.

  2. Ensure the pad covers beyond the edge of the wound.

  3. Hold the pad by the edges and place it directly on top of the wound.

    • Never touch the part of the pad that will be in contact with the wound.
  4. Secure the pad with adhesive tape or a roller bandage.

    • Never wrap tape all the way around the injured part as this could reduce the blood flow. If you need to maintain pressure to control bleeding, use a roller bandage.
    • If you have no pad or gauze available, you can use a clean, non-fluffy material such as a cloth.
Did you find this information helpful?

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